Worawora, Ghana, residents pour water from a village well. Many of the concrete homes in Worawora don’t have electricity or running water. Kofi Addai, a LeMoyne College graduate, got the idea to raise money to build a library for his hometown during a visit home for his father’s funeral.
 When it was time for Hamdiatu Mohammed to go to high school, her mother sold three cows for $45 and sent her stepson to school. She began arranging to marry Hamdiatu for a bride price paid in cattle, but her elder sister intervened. She contacted Censudi, a local group in Bolgatanga, Ghana, helping girls pay for school with help from Syracuse.
 When Hamdiatu Mohammed was a baby, she suffered convulsions. Her parents believed a traditional healer could cure her by cutting her face. She recovered, but hates the one-inch scar that was left. If my parents had attended higher education, they would have gone to the hospital or they would send me for immunizations, she said. She is shown with her four-month-old niece Zena, whose face is scarred by traditional healing.
 In 1995 at age 16 while a secondary school student in Worawora, Kofi Addai won the annual U.S. green card lottery. He went to New York City to attend high school and then received a scholarship to LeMoyne College and graduated in 2004. During a trip to his hometown, he visited his former secondary school and addressed about 300 students. The boys stay in a large dormitory room.
 Worawora, Ghana, residents pour water from a village well. Many of the concrete homes in Worawora don’t have electricity or running water. Kofi Addai, a LeMoyne College graduate, got the idea to raise money to build a library for his hometown during a visit home for his father’s funeral.
Worawora, Ghana, residents pour water from a village well. Many of the concrete homes in Worawora don’t have electricity or running water. Kofi Addai, a LeMoyne College graduate, got the idea to raise money to build a library for his hometown during a visit home for his father’s funeral.
 When it was time for Hamdiatu Mohammed to go to high school, her mother sold three cows for $45 and sent her stepson to school. She began arranging to marry Hamdiatu for a bride price paid in cattle, but her elder sister intervened. She contacted Censudi, a local group in Bolgatanga, Ghana, helping girls pay for school with help from Syracuse.
When it was time for Hamdiatu Mohammed to go to high school, her mother sold three cows for $45 and sent her stepson to school. She began arranging to marry Hamdiatu for a bride price paid in cattle, but her elder sister intervened. She contacted Censudi, a local group in Bolgatanga, Ghana, helping girls pay for school with help from Syracuse.
 When Hamdiatu Mohammed was a baby, she suffered convulsions. Her parents believed a traditional healer could cure her by cutting her face. She recovered, but hates the one-inch scar that was left. If my parents had attended higher education, they would have gone to the hospital or they would send me for immunizations, she said. She is shown with her four-month-old niece Zena, whose face is scarred by traditional healing.
When Hamdiatu Mohammed was a baby, she suffered convulsions. Her parents believed a traditional healer could cure her by cutting her face. She recovered, but hates the one-inch scar that was left. If my parents had attended higher education, they would have gone to the hospital or they would send me for immunizations, she said. She is shown with her four-month-old niece Zena, whose face is scarred by traditional healing.
 In 1995 at age 16 while a secondary school student in Worawora, Kofi Addai won the annual U.S. green card lottery. He went to New York City to attend high school and then received a scholarship to LeMoyne College and graduated in 2004. During a trip to his hometown, he visited his former secondary school and addressed about 300 students. The boys stay in a large dormitory room.
In 1995 at age 16 while a secondary school student in Worawora, Kofi Addai won the annual U.S. green card lottery. He went to New York City to attend high school and then received a scholarship to LeMoyne College and graduated in 2004. During a trip to his hometown, he visited his former secondary school and addressed about 300 students. The boys stay in a large dormitory room.
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